Forum Discussion

jrcoop's avatar
jrcoop
New Contributor
2 years ago

Internet service shifted from coaxial cable to fiber optic???

I've lived in my home for 3 years and had Cox bundled services (TV, Internet, Phone) for the entire time via coaxial cable. When we moved into the house there was a fiber    optic connection (I believe) in a bedroom, which the previous owner had used as an office. When we ordered our Cox services they set everything up through the coaxial cable ... all good.  Last month I received an email from Cox that my modem was eligible for a free upgrade, so I went to the local store and got a new modem. While I was picking up the new modem the clerk said he had already activated it and I could just swap it out and return the old one. When I arrived home the old modem had already been deactivated so I proceeded to swap them out, only to discover that the new one wouldn't connect, either through the PC via ethernet or WiFi from my phone. I called Cox and went through 3 tiers of customer support ... to finally be told that my area is now a fiber optic area and the cable couldn't be used, and there was nothing they could do to get this new cable modem activated TWO HOURS after deactivating the old modem. So now I have no internet and no phone service, until a tech can come out to the house and see what needs to be done to get the fiber optic service operating!!!  How does this happen without anyone from Cox mentioning that this was going to be an issue??  Who at Cox decides to shift an area from cable to fiber optic service and doesn't bother to tell anyone in the affected area???  Has anyone else had this happen to them? I was very polite with all the phone support folks, who were only trying to help - but if there was a way to get a hold of somebody in management who allowed this situation to become so screwed up, the conversation would be very different. Hope this finds its way up the chain ... but not holding my breath.

10 Replies

Replies have been turned off for this discussion
  • Bruce's avatar
    Bruce
    Honored Contributor III

    This doesn't sound right.  Did you notice any trucks with large spools of cable and crews digging trenches in your area during the past year(s)?  Did the crews also dig a trench in your yard or pull cable?  This would indicate your area is now a fiber area.  Cox would not just disconnect you from your neighborhood node without wiring your house.

    Send an email to cox.help@cox.com with the following and request a rep activate your modem:
     - Full Name
     - Complete Address
     - URL of This Post

    Upload a pix of this fiber connection in the bedroom.

    • CurtB's avatar
      CurtB
      Valued Contributor III

      Hey, Bruce.  Verify this for me or tell me I'm wrong.  If the cable from the tap to the customer’s house wasn’t replaced and all the internal wiring and the modem are the same, wouldn’t Cox changing the main line from cable to fiber be transparent to a customer?   Wouldn’t the only noticeable difference  be a likely improved signal?

      • Bruce's avatar
        Bruce
        Honored Contributor III

        From the neighborhood node to the house wasn't replaced?  Yes, it'd be transparent to the customer because the neighborhood node would be converting the signal from light to electrical.

        Light being immune from EMI, yes, much better signal...that is, if OP had a noisy signal.

    • jrcoop's avatar
      jrcoop
      New Contributor

      Thanks for the reply. All three support folks I spoke with tried to activate the modem, with each one bumping me up to a more senior rep when they were unable to. The explanation from the final one went on to say that their system was not allowing them to activate the modem because my area has been designated for fiber and new (or in my case, replacement) modems must be fiber. Apparently they're intending to shift homes to fiber as accounts transition. A tech is coming out tomorrow so hopefully I'll get the full story then ... no telling how much the phone reps actually knew beyond what their screens were telling them. I do indeed have a fiber ONT in the bedroom; and one of the support folks seemed to think it's been here for 7 years and was surprised they had been able to activate the cable modem three years ago. Sounds to me like their training needs to catch up with their technology.

      • Bruce's avatar
        Bruce
        Honored Contributor III

        Maybe the previous occupant had Fios but Cox couldn't support fiber seven years ago.  Now Cox can.

        So...until Cox makes the "shift," you'll have no service from Cox.  Does Verizon serve your neighborhood?

        Seven years ago, could residential satellite dishes send signals into a home via fiber?

  • CplJ's avatar
    CplJ
    New Contributor II

    Sounds like the neighborhood has been wired for PON fiber for a good minute (brownfield) and the previous occupants of the house were subscribed to GPON (gigabit over PON). As a way to improve reliability and higher upload speeds immediately, any new transactions are likely set to get a PON upgrade. This caused an inconvenience for the OP but it is well worth it long term. Cox has had GPON fiber in some of their areas since late 2015 so it would make sense if the rep said its been there for 7 years. 

    Also this being a brownfield overbuild, fiber was ran overlaid on the existing coaxial HFC network. So both transport methods are available.